Podcasts

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The first time I ever heard a podcast was when I moved from the Midwest to the Pacific Northwest. My traveling companion had loaded her MP3 player with music and words for our journey. At some point we listed to an episode of Stuff You Should Know about fluoride. (You can find that episode here: http://www.stuffyoushouldknow.com/podcasts/is-fluoride-making-us-stupid.htm.)

Me Talk Pretty One Day
SIDENOTE: On that road trip, we also listened to David Sedaris read essays from his book Me Talk Pretty One Day. My favorite story in that book is “Jesus Shaves.” We had to stop playing it before it was over because my traveling companion was laughing so hard she was crying, making driving dangerous. (The image to the left is connected to my Amazon affiliate link. If you click on it to shop, I will receive a commission from your purchases.)

If you don’t know, according to http://www.dictionary.com/browse/podcast?s=t, a podcast is

a digital audio or video file or recording, usually part of a themed series, that can be downloaded from a website to a media player or computer.

The first podcast I really, really liked was RISK! Here’s what the RISK! webpage (http://risk-show.com/about-us/) has to say:

 RISK! is a live show and podcast “where people tell true stories they never thought they’d dare to share in public” hosted by Kevin Allison, of the legendary TV sketch comedy troupe The State. The award-winning live show happens monthly in New York and Los Angeles…The weekly podcast gets around a million downloads each month. Slate.com called it “jaw-dropping, hysterically funny, and just plain touching.”

If you want to hear people tell true stories about sex, drugs, feces, humiliation, and sketchy parenting (among other things) while using lots of curse words, RISK! is the podcast for you. It is not a lie, cliché, or hyperbole when I say I’ve laughed ’til I cried while listening to the stories of RISK!, and sometimes I’ve just cried.

To listen to RISK! for yourself, go here: http://risk-show.com/listen/.

I like to have a podcast on while I’m doing work with my hands, typically work that doesn’t take too much brain power. Washing dishes? Podcast. Making hemp bracelets and necklaces? Podcast. Creating hats from yarn? Podcast. Cooking a meal? Podcast. Folding clothes? Podcast. Gluing little bits of paper into a collage? Podcast.

I revisited Stuff You Should Know a few years ago while house sitting in a secluded location. The house had no television, and it was just me and the dogs out there. I missed human voices. Hearing the banter of the hosts of the podcast, Charles (Chuck) Bryant and Josh Clark, made me feel less alone.

You can find episodes of Stuff You Should Know here: http://www.stuffyoushouldknow.com/podcasts.

Stuff You Should Know led me to Stuff You Missed in History Class since both programs are produced by the same parent company, How Stuff Works. Find all the offerings of How Stuff Works here: http://www.howstuffworks.com/.

Stuff You Missed in History Class has gone through a series of hosts since its beginning. My favorite hosts of the program are the two current smart and sassy women, Tracy V. Wilson and Holly Frey. I enjoy their comfortable presentation style while feeling confident they did their homework before hitting the record button. The amount of reading and research these women do for each episode is amazing. Holly and Tracy give us more than just the history of rich white dudes. I appreciate their inclusion of episodes about feisty women and LGBTQ folks fighting for civil rights.

If you want to listen to episodes of Stuff You Missed in History Class, go here: http://www.missedinhistory.com/podcasts.

While downloading podcasts from iTunes, I discovered Death, Sex & Money. The show’s website (http://www.wnyc.org/shows/deathsexmoney) calls Death, Sex & Money

[a] podcast hosted by Anna Sale about the big questions and hard choices that are often left out of polite conversation.

I appreciate the way Anna Sale asks really personal questions while managing to express deep kindness and intense curiosity. She really knows how to get root of the matter without seeming pushy or mean. Of course, many of the episodes are heart-rending, covering topics from dead mothers and fathers (sad) to dead infants (super sad). The episodes focusing on sex and money tend to be a little more fun, although no less thought-provoking.

One of my favorite episodes of this show is an interview with Lucinda Williams (http://www.wnyc.org/story/lucinda-williams-death-sex-money). Lucinda starts off honest and raw and stays that way for nearly half an hour. Also fantastic is the five part series about New Orleans ten years after Hurricane Katrina. (You can start that New Orleans series here: http://www.wnyc.org/story/in-new-orleans-from-raising-hell-to-raising-kids.)

Check out everything Death, Sex & Money here: http://www.wnyc.org/shows/deathsexmoney.

My newest favorite is Myths and Legends, featuring my podcast boyfriend, Jason Weiser. (Shhh! Jason doesn’t know he’s my podcast boyfriend. Neither does his wife.) Not only do I enjoy Jason’s calm, soothing voice and his snarky-funny comments (he holds nothing back when he talks about The Little Mermaid), but the stories from around the world are fun to listen to. Sometimes when I’m stressed out, I put the volume of my phone down low, start this program playing, and let Jason’s tranquil voice comfort me all night.

Here’s what Myths and Legends has to say for itself:

This is a weekly podcast telling legendary stories as closely to the originals as possible. Some are incredibly popular stories you think you know, but with surprising origins. Others are stories that might be new to you, but are definitely worth a listen.

If you want to be soothed by Jason’s voice and entertained by the stories, go here: https://www.mythpodcast.com/.

That’s what I’m listening to these days, when I’m not listening to music. I hope these suggestion inspire my readers to listen to some new, educational podcasts. Feel free to leave a comment about your favorite podcast.

2 Responses »

  1. I am going to have to look up some of those podcasts. I am already familiar with David Sedaris. My grand-daughter was in college and he read some of his stories on two different occasions when she was able to get cheap tickets. She met him and had a couple books signed too. She is about as crazy as he is, so they kind of hit it off, as much as any writer can hit it off with a good looking student whom he never expects to see again. Anyhow, I believe he prefers men. She did enjoy talking and listening to him. I will look forward to listening to some of the others you pointed out when I have the opportunity.

    • I’m glad you found the post informative, Marcia.

      I’ve never been to a David Sedaris reading, but I have a friend who’s been once, maybe twice. Tickets are probably out of my price range now, but I got to see Lucinda Williams for free once, thanks to a Craigslist ad. Who knows what the future holds?

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