The Practical Sabbatical: It’s Not Just About Taking a Break (Guest Post)

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Today’s guest post is all about sabbaticals, why they are important, and how you can manage to take one. It was written by Catherine Workman.

A sabbatical is the act of taking an extended rest period from work. This time away can help you reboot, relax, and recharge. However, more importantly, breaking away from the mundane of daily life can help you get to know yourself, get in touch with your needs, and prioritize your physical and mental well-being. Sadly, many people forgo this life-changing vacation due to funds or fear of losing their position at work. But there is evidence to suggest that you’re doing yourself more harm than good by clocking in and out 40 or more hours each week.

Saving for a Sabbatical

Your first priority is to determine the lifestyle you’ll lead while you’re away. You might backpack across the globe, stay stateside in an RV, or cruise from every port along the coasts. This will give you a baseline of your expenses. Western and Southern Financial Group notes that your estimate should also include life insurance and smart budgeting.

If you choose to continue to work during your travels, you won’t have to save quite as much, but you’ll be missing out on the full benefit of your journey’s purpose. Another income option is to rent your home while you’re away. You can do this via VRBO, Airbnb, or through a local real estate firm that specializes in property management. If you go this route, get your house ready to ensure great reviews and, thus, more rental income. Start by removing your valuables, then clean it from top to bottom, all the while eliminating clutter and making any small repairs. Angie’s List handy online guide has more sound advice on how to prepare your rental property.

Other ways to put money aside for the adventure include funding a dedicated travel account, reducing daily expenses, skipping a few luxuries throughout the year.

How and When to Ask

If you plan to return to your job when you get back, you’ll have to give your employer plenty of advance notice. Come up with a few ways your workload could be taken care of; that way, when you approach your boss, you’ll have an answer to this question. If possible, try to plan your leave to correspond with the completion of a major project, and offer to be flexible if it runs over by a few weeks or months. By doing so, you can help your employer avoid a panic-mode “no” when you’re finally set to head out. Even if you discuss your plans in person, write a leave-of-absence letter and copy both your immediate supervisors and the HR department.

The New Retirement

Taking a “pretirement” now isn’t the same as taking a long trip after retirement. You leave with the intentions of returning to work at some point, and the time away can actually be good for your career. Leaving work gives you a chance to evaluate what you’re doing and what you want to do differently when you return. Former Cisco Systems Chief of Staff Mary Ann Higgs says her sabbatical helped her identify and process her accomplishments and disappointments.

Just as important as rest is that you can use your time off to reach your personal fitness goals. A healthy sabbatical can give you a chance to learn yoga, trek through the mountains, or swim in seas you’ve never seen. Even if you don’t plan to exercise your way across the entire globe, you can still stay fit while you’re on the road.

The thought of leaving all you’ve worked for can be intimidating. However, wealth is not as valuable as wellness. Sometimes, it pays to take a leap of faith into the unknown and unexplored. But before you, get your finances in order, plan to prioritize your health, and, if you want to return to work, leave on a high note and with the well-wishes of your employer.

Catherine Workman believes we should all leave our comfort zones once in a while. She travels to boost her physical and mental health.

Image via Pixabay

About Blaize Sun

My name is Blaize Sun. Maybe that's the name my family gave me; maybe it's not. In any case, that's the name I'm using here and now. I've been a rubber tramp for nearly a decade.I like to see places I've never seen before, and I like to visit the places I love again and again. For most of my years on the road, my primary residence was my van. For almost half of the time I was a van dweller, I was going it alone. Now my (male) partner and I (a woman) have a travel trailer we can pull with our truck. We have a little piece of property, and when we're not traveling, we park our little camper there. I was a work camper in a remote National Forest recreation area on a mountain for four seasons. I was a camp host and parking lot attendant for two seasons and wrote a book about my experiences called Confessions of a Work Camper: Tales from the Woods. During the last two seasons as a work camper on that mountain, I was a clerk in a campground store. I'm also a house and pet sitter, and I pick up odd jobs when I can. I'm primarily a writer, but I also create beautiful little collages; hand make hemp jewelry and warm, colorful winter hats; and use my creative and artistic skills to decorate my life and brighten the lives of others. My goal (for my writing and my life) is to be real. I don't like fake, and I don't want to share fake. I want to share my authentic thoughts and feelings. I want to give others space and permission to share their authentic selves. Sometimes I think the best way to support others is to leave them alone and allow them to be. I am more than just a rubber tramp artist. I'm fat. I'm funny. I'm flawed. I try to be kind. I'm often grouchy. I am awed by the stars in the dark desert night. I hope my writing moves people. If my writing makes someone laugh or cry or feel angry or happy or troubled or comforted, I have done my job. If my writing makes someone think and question and try a little harder, I've done my job. If my writing opens a door for someone, changes a life, I have done my job well. I hope you enjoy my blog posts, my word and pictures, the work I've done to express myself in a way others will understand. I hope you appreciate the time and energy I put into each post. I hope you will click the like button each time you like what you have read. I hope you will share posts with the people in your life. I hope you'll leave a comment and share your authentic self with me and this blog's other readers. Thank you for reading.  A writer without readers is very sad indeed.

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