Category Archives: Quotes

Maggie Kuhn

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In the third post about the Play Me, I’m Yours piano installation in Mesa, AZ, I mentioned one of the reasons for writing given on the piano presented by Phonetic Spit was this: I write to speak my mind, even when my voice shakes.

I knew I’d seen some variation of the quote before, but who’d said it? Audre Lorde? Alice Walker? I did a Google search and found Maggie Kuhn was the woman who gave us those words.

Who’s Maggie Kuhn? I didn’t know either, until I did a little reading up on her.

According to http://womenshistory.about.com/cs/quotes/a/maggie_kuhn.htm,

Maggie Kuhn is best known for founding the organization often called the Gray Panthers [officially known at first as the Consultation of Older and Younger Adults for Social Change], a social activist organization raising issues of justice and fairness for older Americans. She is credited with the passage of laws prohibiting forced retirement and with reform in health care and nursing home oversight.

The Wikipedia article about Kuhn tells more about the work she and the Gray Panthers did.

In 1970, although [Kuhn] was working at a job she loved with the Presbyterian Church, she was forced to retire the day she turned 65 because of the mandatory retirement law then in effect. That year, she banded together with other retirees and formed the Gray Panthers movement. Seeing all issues of injustice as inevitably linked, they refused to restrict themselves to elder rights activism, but focused also on peace, presidential elections, poverty, and civil liberties. Their first big issue was opposition to the Vietnam War.

The Gray Panthers’ motto was “Age and Youth In Action,” and many of its members were high school and college students. Kuhn believed that teens should be taken more seriously and given more responsibility by society.

Kuhn raised controversy by openly discussing the sexuality of older people, and shocked the public with her assertion that older women, who outlive men by an average of 8 years, could develop sexual relationships with younger men or each other.

I couldn’t find any information about when or where Kuhn said or wrote her famous words advising us to speak our minds, but I did find the longer quote of which these words are part. The Presbyterian Historical Society gives the longer quote as

Leave safety behind. Put your body on the line. Stand before the people you fear and speak your mind–even if your voice shakes. When you least expect it, someone may actually listen to what you have to say. Well-aimed slingshots can topple giants.

I suspect Maggie Kuhn would be quite pleased to know young people remembered her sentiment and wrote it on a piano in an Arizona town for all to see.

 

The Rhythm of Travel

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I recently wrote about Clara Bensen’s book No Baggage. One of the things she wrote about travel struck me as particularly true.

This was the rhythm of travel–exhausting marathons of movement punctuated by surprising moments of calm where time slowed and there was nowhere to be except right here…

No Baggage: A Minimalist Tale of Love and Wandering

We Create the World

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However unimportant our little lives may be, however invisible we may sometimes feel, we create the world around us just by being in it.

–Katie Haegele

Katie Haegele used to be a pen pal of mine, but we haven’t been in touch in many years.

Slip of the Tongue: Talking About Language (Real World)
At the end of 2014 I entered a giveaway on GoodReads for a book called Slip of the Tongue that sounded interesting. I didn’t realize at the time that the book was written by someone I knew. When I received notification that I’d won the book, I still didn’t realize that I knew the author. It was only when I found the book in my mailbox and tore off the wrapping and saw Katie’s name written in that font she used in her zines that I made the connection.

It’s a great book. It’s about language and Katie’s life and the role language plays in shaping Katie’s life. I recommend it to all you word geeks out there.

My favorite part of the whole book is the one sentence I used to open this post. It’s from the essay “Invisible Weaver.” That one sentence gives me hope. Sometimes I feel so useless. What am I creating that will outlast me? Am I doing anything that will live on after I am dead? Sometimes I feel my life is a complete and utter waste. But maybe, if as Katie says, I am creating the world just by being in it, maybe I’m doing ok.